For someone who has been issued speeding and traffic violation tickets, a SR-22 is nothing new to you.   This is a certificate accompanied by a court order which proves that you currently have auto insurance coverage. You need this form in order to continue driving legally. You may be required to carry SR-22 based on the following situations:

  • You committed DUI or DWI
  • You failed to maintain auto insurance coverage in the past
  • You had a serious driving related offense

While it is still in your possession, here are some things you need to know about the SR-22:

  1. It is not insurance

Although it is often referred to as SR-22 insurance, it is worth noting that it does not replace auto insurance. It is just a certification from your car insurance provider stating that you have auto insurance liability policy that complies with the minimum requirements of your state. According to the Texas Department of Public Safety (TxDPS), those who do not own a vehicle should ask an insurance provider about a Texas Non-Owner SR-22 Insurance policy.

  1. You must already have minimum liability coverage

Prior to filing an SR-22, you first need to have at least a minimum liability coverage. The amount will vary depending on the state you are located. As auto insurance is required in the United States, you need coverage to maintain your driving privileges.

Upon presentation of the SR-22 form, you will then get your proof of insurance. You can get it by getting in touch with an auto insurance company in the state that requires insurance. They will provide the insurance or mail it directly to the state.

  1. Duration of SR-22

The duration of the SR-22 will vary from one state to another. In some states, it could be as short as a year to as long as five years. On the average, you need to carry the SR-22 from 2 – 3 years. So while carrying the certificate, take advantage of clearing your driving record so that you can start with a clean slate when you apply for reinstatement of your driving license.

When moving to a new state, you need to keep your SR-22 from the original state where you filed for the form and then make sure that the insurance company where you are applying also meets the minimum liability requirement.

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